Skip to main content

Dublin City Library & Archive

New ‘Gateway’ to Archival Treasures Launched

Archivists at LaunchDublin City Archives is one of 30 prominent archival repositories who have contributed to  www.iar.ie  Ireland’s only archive web portal. The website was re-launched on Wed 16 September 2014 by Minister Heather Humphreys T.D., Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht to mark the expansion of the website and the provision of access to hundreds of unique archival collections.  

The IAR portal enables visitors to access a free database of archival collections from archival repositories all over Ireland, north and south, many of which contain archives of relevance to the period 1912 to 1922, commonly referred to as the Decade of Centenaries.  Read more »

1916: The Women Behind the Men

View 1916: The Women behind the Men Image Gallery

Margaret SkinniderFor generations, the Easter Rising of 1916 was synonymous with the seven names: Thomas J. Clarke, Seán Mac Diarmada, Thomas MacDonagh, P. H. Pearse, Eamonn Ceannt, James Connolly and Joseph Plunkett. These were the seven signatories of the Proclamation of the Irish Republic: all men and all executed in the days after the Rising, which immortalised them as martyrs of the revolution. The sacrifice of these men was to perpetuate a certain mythology that overtook the actual events of the Easter Rising. The bravery, self-sacrifice and single-minded dedication to Irish independence of these men was, for a long time, all one needed to know about the Rising. Yet, as the centenary of the 1916 Rising approaches, interest has broadened to take in other historical perspectives of the Rising: Who were the other nine men who were executed for their role in the Rising, for example? Who were the rebels and soldiers killed in action during Easter week? What was the experience of those civilians who were killed (more than rebel and British soldiers combined)? And, most importantly for this study, what part was played by women in the Easter Rising and what can the families of those men who died as a result of 1916 tell us about the kind of people they actually were?

Read more »

Dublin Heritage: The life history of a city

DG10a GPO

View Dublin Heritage: the life history of a city Image Gallery

When the Vikings founded the city in the ninth century in the area of the “black pool” (Dubh Linn in Irish) where Dublin Castle is today, they started what would later become the capital of Ireland and the largest city in the country. Dublin is a key to understanding Ireland; the history of this city helps us to better understand the history of the whole of the country, its development, its cultural features, its social composition and the political peculiarities in Ireland.

While we are walking through the streets of the city and we see the historical buildings and places, we realise the cultural wealth that this city has to offer. Nothing remains visible from the period before the Viking settlement except what you can see in the collections, exhibitions or museums in the city (the most important being the National Museum in Kildare Street). But it was with the Vikings, as we said before, that the city began its development. They ruled the city until 1014, when they were defeated by the Irish King Brian Boru in the famous Battle of Clontarf, near Dublin. Although they had lost their political supremacy, they remained in the city some more years with commerce as their principal activity. Then Ireland was invaded by the Anglo-Normans and in 1171, Diarmait Mac Murchada, King of Leinster, and Strongbow conquered Dublin and expelled the Vikings from the city. The following year Dublin received a City Charter from King Henry II; it was the beginning of the English rule of Ireland. Then Dublin Castle, built in 1204 by direct order of King John of England, became the centre of English power. Read more »

The Yeats Sisters and the Cuala Press

YC001 Dawn Song

View The Yeats Sisters and Cuala Press Image Gallery

At the same time as the Celtic Revival during the late 19th - early 20th centuries, the Arts & Crafts Movement was making its way across Europe. This movement saw an international increase in the making and purchasing of handmade things and included ‘cottage industries’ such as stained glass, woodworks, ceramics, tapestries, and more. The Yeats family, in particular, was greatly involved in several aspects of both the Celtic Revival and the Arts & Crafts Movement. While W.B. was making his mark in the literary world and Jack was working as an artist and illustrator, the Yeats sisters, Lily and Elizabeth, were running their own businesses. Read more »

Life-Long Learning Courses at Dublin City Library and Archive

Front Cover of Oral History Brochure

The Lord Mayor’s Certificate in Oral History, and the Lord Mayor’s Certificate in Local Studies are two courses, run by Dublin City Archives, which are offered to the public as part of Dublin City Council’s commitment to life long learning.   Applications are now being accepted for both courses for the 2014-2015 academic year, with bursararies also available.

The courses will appeal to anyone who has an active interest in history, and want to learn how to engage with a variety of different research methods and sources, and to write up their findings in the form of a dissertation/research project.  

Ann- Louise Mullhall, one of the participants on the Lord Mayor’s Certificate in Oral History in 2013-2014 has kindly provided us with a review of the course:   Read more »

Remembering Irish Men and Women who served in the First World War

Royal Dublin Fusilers BadgeThe Imperial War Museum has just launched a new project to create a permanent digital memorial to every man and woman who served in the First World War.   This ambitious undertaking asks members of the public to share the life story of any relative they have uncovered who served in World War 1. One of the first life stories uploaded to the website relates to the life of Irish man Private Michael Lennon who served with the Royal Dublin Fusiliers Read more »

Syndicate content