Skip to main content

Science Week 2014

The Value of Accessing a Magazine

Time Magazine cover

What is an online magazine? An online magazine – ejournal - is a resource allowing up-to-the-minute articles be published and  distributed world wide in seconds via electronic transmission.  Menu driven databases are easily searchable with a title, date, and keyword option available. This saves times for researchers, journalists, students, teachers etc as the tedious work of trawling through endless magazines (in hard copy) to locate a subject topic no longer exists.  The library bears the brunt of any cost implications involved in subscribing to these ejournals as they are free to use by the public -just 20c per page for black and white print outs. Saving to a memory stick is not permitted due to licence agreements.

What ejournals do we have? The Business Information Centre provides access to a large number of ejournals via our subscription to 3 ejournal providers – Emerald, European Business ASAP – Infotrac and JSTOR.

Emerald Journals Online Emerald allows the user full texts from international business journals and reviews from worldwide top management journals - 13 different subject categories are provided by Emerald including Accounting, Finance & Economics; Business, Management & Strategy; HR, Learning & Organizational Studies; Information & Knowledge Management; Marketing; Operations, Logistics & Quality; Property Management & Built Environment; Public Policy & Environmental Management; Tourism & Hospitality; Education, Engineering; Health & Social Care; Library Studies. Well worth looking into. Read more »

Tales of Medieval Dublin

Posted in

What was it like to be a peasant, a potter or a poet in Medieval Dublin? Find out about these and others who made their living as miller, mason, man-of-law and more! What challenges and conflicts did they face? These interesting talks show how new research can help illuminate the lives of early Dubliners and allow us gain an insight into their lives. 

These talks are part of Tales of Medieval Dublin: A series of monthly lunchtime lectures which took place in 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013 at the Wood Quay Venue, Civic Offices, Wood Quay. The series was presented by the Friends of Medieval Dublin and Dublin City Council. Read more »

Chinese New Year 2014 - The Year of the Horse

Posted in

Chinese New Year logoEstablished in 2008 the Dublin Chinese New Year Festival (DCNYF) showcases the best of Sino Irish Culture in Ireland. This year the festival as always will be delivering a high profile cultural programme including many diverse and exciting events.

The Libraries' programme includes a range of events for both children and adults, including storytelling sessions, and arts and crafts workshops.

For a taste of what you can expect, listen to storyteller Aideen McBride telling the tale of General Five Tiger, from Chinese Fairy Tales and Folk Tales. Translated from the German by Desmond Parsons, 1937:

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

[play time 07:43 mins. Size 7.07 MB] 

Transcript

You can also view the citywide programme of activities and more on the Festival website. Read more »

Debut Novel Wins Costa Book Award

Posted in

The Shock of the FallThe Costa Book of the Year 2013 overall winner is the debut novel, 'The Shock of the Fall' by Nathan Filer (Harper Collins Publishers).

As the judges had to say - "It’s hard to believe this is a first novel – it’s so good it will make you feel a better person."

About the Book

The Shock of the Fall tells the story of Matthew and Simon, two brothers who are separated yet united by a tragic accident. Exploring themes of loss, grief and mental illness, this extraordinary novel transports the reader directly into the mind of Matthew and his slow descent into madness as he confronts his role in the boyhood death of his older brother ten years ago.. Read more »

2013: My (Crime Fiction) Year in Review

2013 5-star readsUpon reading a blog post recently where book reviewers highlighted their favourite crime fiction reads of 2013, I got curious as to how my year just gone had fared in similiar respect. So I took a look back over my 2013, what I had read, what I had thought of the various authors and their books, and in so doing see what overall impression I was left with, and what books made it to the top of my list.

Right: The Top 4 of 2013 (see below for more details)

I should preface what is to follow by stating that most, but not all, of the books I read tend to be either recently published or, if in translation, recently translated. After reading a book I give it a star rating, 5 being the maximum number of stars. Anything that gets 3.5 stars or more I can well recommend, 3 stars is borderline, while anything less disappointed. The star sytem of course is not a precise measure, but can be used as a rough rule of thumb. But enough of that! Read more »

Sir John T. Gilbert, Irish Historian and Archivist

Sir John T. GilbertJohn Thomas Gilbert, born in Dublin on the 23rd January 1829, was the author of the influential three-volume 'History of the City of Dublin', published from 1854-59. He was a firm advocate of documenting the history of his native city using primary sources. His work on manuscripts relating to the city alerted him to the need for the preservation of Irish public records, many of which were in a neglected and vulnerable condition. He commenced a campaign, which eventually led to the setting up of the Public Records Office in the Four Courts. He calendared the records of Dublin Corporation, which date from the twelfth century, and began the series of printed volumes 'The calendar of ancient records of the city of Dublin'.

Brief Biography

John Thomas Gilbert was the son of John Gilbert, an English Protestant, and Marianne Costello, an Irish Catholic. He was born in house no. 23 Jervis Street, Dublin, on the 23rd January 1829. He was educated at Bective College, Dublin, and at Prior Park, near Bath, England. In 1846 his family moved to Blackrock, County Dublin, where he lived until his death in May 1898. Read more »

Syndicate content Syndicate content