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Spotlight on the Image Collections

What's in a Title?

Mercy aka The Keeper of Lost CausesThe Keeper of Lost Causes aka MercyWhat's in a title, you may ask? Well, clarity you hope, but might I suggest instead, confusion and sometimes too time wasted. Whatever am I talking about, you might wonder. Let me ask - how often have you went looking for a book, only to discover that the title you seek is not the title that resides on the library bookshelf or the bookseller's for that matter? How often have you started to read a book only to soon get a feeling you've read it before? What I am getting at is the confusion that can abound because of the habit of publishers of releasing the same book under different titles. Sometimes it's a case that titles differ depending on the market (e.g. UK v US) but also too the title can change in the same market with the release of a new or paperback edition. And if that isn't confusing enough, book covers change too!

A case in point is a favourite author of mine, Denmark's Jussi Adler-Olsen, writer of the Department Q crime series, which to date consists of five titles in Danish, four of which have so far been translated into english and all of which have different UK and US titles: Read more »

Nelson and Company: The Moving Statues of Dublin

MS31 Anna Livia

View 'Nelson and Company: The Moving Statues of Dublin' Image Gallery.

Monuments and statues are a significant feature of the cityscape of Dublin; some make an appearance for a short period of time, while others become more permanent fixtures.  This collection of images represents some of those statues that have spent time in the capital city, as well as some that are soon to move.  Certain monuments that no longer adorn the streets and parks of Dublin reflect the nation’s indefatigable struggle to regain independence, such as those that were notably connected to the British Monarchy, which unfortunately included the only three equestrian statues in Ireland. Over the years monuments were destroyed, but not always beyond repair; and there are those that can now be found in new surroundings in other parts of the world, such as the monument to Queen Victoria, once to be seen in the grounds of Leinster House on Kildare Street but now stands proudly outside the Queen Victoria Building in Sydney, Australia. Read more »

Andrew Carnegie, The Library Man

Andrew CarnegieIn 1902, Rathmines and Rathgar Urban District Council applied for a grant to Andrew Carnegie who was at that time dispensing large sums of money for the building of libraries, the world over. The application was successful and in 1903 a sum of £7,500, later increased to £8,500 was granted. The Library and Technical Institute were opened on October 24th, 1913.

Right: Andrew Carnegie

To celebrate the centenary of Rathmines Library, Brendan Langley gave a talk on the fascinating life of Andrew Carnegie, the industrialist and philantrophist entitled "Andrew Carnegie, The Library Man". Brendan Langley is a local historian with a long association with the Rathmines, Ranelagh and Rathgar Historical Society.

The lecture took place on Tuesday, 15 October 2013 at 6.30pm, at Rathmines Library and was part of the programme celebrating Rathmines Library 1913 - 2013 100 Years at the Heart of the Community. Read more »

Irish Carnegie Libraries, An Architectural History

Rathmines LibraryBetween 1897 and 1913, Andrew Carnegie donated over £170,000 to fund the building of eighty libraries in Ireland. Sixty-two of those libraries have survived to the present day including Rathmines Library, which opened on 24 October 1913. To celebrate the centenary of Rathmines Library, Brendan Grimes gave a very interesting talk outlining the history of Irish Carnegie Libraries and detailing the architectural history of Rathmines Library entitled "Irish Carnegie Libraries, an Architectural History".

Brendan Grimes is an architect and former lecturer of the School of Architecture, DIT. His publications include Irish Carnegie libraries, a catalogue and architectural history and Majestic shrines and graceful sanctuaries, the church architecture of Patrick Byrne 1783-1864. Read more »

Crow Lake by Mary Lawson - a review

Review by Pembroke Library Reading Group

Bookcover: Crow Lake by Mary LawsonCrow Lake is set in Canada – the narrator has grown up in remote rural East Ontario, and has studied in Toronto, where she is now a lecturer.

The story looks at how four children cope in the year after the sudden death of their parents. The oldest, Luke, 19, has given up teacher training to bring up his sisters, aged 7 and 1½.  At the end of the year Matt, 18, has secured a scholarship, but has to take responsibility for the pregnancy of Marie Pye, the orphaned girl next door, and exchanges an academic career for fatherhood and running a farm.

The narrator, Kate, is 7 at the time of their parents’ death and very attached to Matt. Members of their community step in to help and the boys work for Mr. Pye next door after school. The Pyes have a multi-generational dysfunctional history of fathers bullying their children. Tragic circumstances bring Matt and Marie Pye together. Read more »

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