Skip to main content

Spotlight on the Image Collections

Our Blog is set to move! Yes, this library blog (and our Image Galleries) will soon be moving to a new home on the Libraries website. Watch this space for an update in the coming weeks! (Posted: 13th March) 

Dublin: a City Made of Stories?

Pictured left-right: Nessa O'Mahony, Ellen Rowley, Garett Fagan, Kelly Fitzgerald and Niamh PuirséilWhat do we think of when we think of Dublin?

How has the history and physical shape of the city influenced its poems, songs and stories? How do poems, songs, stories, history and the built environment create our sense of Dublin as a city? Join Garrett Fagan, for a lively panel discussion on what makes Dublin the city that it is.

Pictured left-right: Nessa O'Mahony, Ellen Rowley, Garrett Fagan, Kelly Fitzgerald and Niamh Puirséil

Listen to a recording of ‘Dublin: a City Made of Stories?’ Poets, folklorists, historians and city geographers discuss how poems, songs, stories, history and the physical space create our sense of Dublin as a city. This event was organised by Garrett Fagan, and was held in the National Library of Ireland, Kildare Street on Saturday, 12 April as part of Dublin: One City, One Book 2014. Read more »

Dublin City Electoral Lists (1908-10) Available Online

Electoral Rolls, before and after restorationWe're delighted to announce that we've digitised another two years of the Dublin City Electoral Lists and the entries for the three years of 1908, 1909 and 1910 are now fully searchable on dublinheritage.ie - a great resource for family history, local history and social history, containing 160,600 records.

Access the Dublin City Electoral Lists 1908 to 1910 on dublinheritage.ie.

Photo: Hard copy restoration, before and after view. See slideshow below for more images. Read more »

Commemorating Clontarf: The Battle and its Legacy

Battle of Clontart Milennium 1014-20142014 is the millennium of the Battle of Clontarf, which took place on Good Friday 23 April 1014. Commemorating Clontarf: the battle and its legacy was the theme of the City Hall lunchtime lecture series this April. It was standing room only at each of these popular lectures. So in case you missed them we are giving you the chance to listen back to two fascinating lectures. Dr Colm Lennon's lecture explores how the legend of Brian Boru and the battle of Clontarf has been adopted as a means of advancing different ideologies throughout Irish history, and how modern scholarly research using antiquarian sources and textual and scientific research are helping separate fact from myth. Dr Howard Clarke re-examines the reputation of Queen Gormlaith and Brian Boru while looking at the rules of marriage, and the bewilderingly complicated nature of the relationships between some of the key players in the battle of Clontarf.

The City Hall lecture series is organised by Dublin City Archives. Read more »

If ever you go - Katherine Tynan 'Sheep and lambs'

Sheep and lambs by Katharine Tynan'Sheep and lambs', this charming poem always cheers me up because spring is my favourite time of year, and Easter is my favourite festival, and when I read this poem, or hear it being sung or recited, it brings to my mind a time of beauty, hope and renewal.

It also transports me back to a sunlit classroom, the day before I was to go home for my Easter holidays, when one of my teachers read this poem to the class. It was the first time I had ever heard it and so, for me, it will always be associated with thoughts of home, family and childhood Easters. Read more »

If ever you go - Dublinesque by Philip Larkin

Postcard of O'Connell Street DublinIn the early 1950s (1950-1955) the English poet Philip Larkin lived in Belfast, where he was working as Librarian in Queen’s University. While there he made a number of visits to Dublin.

During this time he wrote many of the poems which made up his first major collection The Less Deceived (1955). The proposed collection was rejected by several English publishers, leading Larkin to submit it to the Dublin based Dolmen Press in 1954. But they also declined to publish it. Despite this rejection and a generally negative view of Dublin, expressed on a number of occasions to friends (“I prefer Belfast to Dublin - not architecturally of course, but architecture isn’t everything.” Selected Letters of Philip Larkin, P182), he retained enough memories of the place to evoke it in a later poem ‘Dublinesque’. Read more »

Syndicate content Syndicate content